Amorous Amphibians

It’s March, so it must be time for the frogs to start croaking their intentions! Our pond is suddenly seething with noisy, rambunctious males, all competing for the attentions of the few females. They take up their positions and wait, croaking all the while. As soon as anyone moves, or another frog surfaces, they all pile over there and jump on it. There is much jostling and grabbing and then the male (for it is almost always a male) gives a ‘release croak’ – the amphibian equivalent of ‘gerroff, I’m not a girl’ – and they all resume their positions. There are three pairs in amplexus, the mating hold, where the smaller male manages to grab himself a big female and hangs on for dear life. The other males then try at regular intervals to unseat him.

We have an unusually coloured female, deep brick red. She appeared in our pond soon after we created it (almost 4 years ago) and has been around ever since. This is the third breeding season we’ve had and it’s nice to see she’s still around.

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14 thoughts on “Amorous Amphibians

    • Hi Phil, such a noise from the pond last night! Lucy didn’t tell me that I would be frog-sitting as well as house- and dog-sitting!

  1. What a nice video, Lucy! This makes my day! I never knew frogs were so social.
    Winter is coming back this weekend in the Netherlands 😦

    • Hi Charles, I’m Maggie, Lucy’s mum, house-, dog- and frog-sitting, while she is in Italy. The noise from the pond last night was incredible! We are expecting snow on Monday, I hope it doesn’t affect the frogs or the large amount of frog-spawn that they have already laid!

      • Hi Maggie, nice to hear from you! Indeed, completely forgotten that Lucy is in Italy. I hope the weather in Italy is better than ours. The snow lies mainly in the south of the Netherlands. In Belgium the file was longer than the number of kilometers motorway they have. Really!
        The photos of the frogs are fantastic! They look very friendly and curious. I need to adjust my opinion about frogs 😉

  2. Pingback: Many are the frogs. | The Foraging Photographer

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