One for Kevin.

This one is for my step-dad, who grew up in Kinver, where these photos were taken.

The rock houses are dwellings hewn from sandstone rock, inhabited from 1770 until the 1950s. They have since been restored by the National Trust and are open to the public. We had dogs with us so didn’t go inside, but had a lovely walk up to Kinver Edge, with panoramic views over the surrounding counties. Kinver itself is very beautiful, with lots of traditional small shops and historical buildings. I wonder how much it’s changed since Kevin roamed there as a boy?

Here is the National Trust site for the rock houses, and here is an explanation of the geology of the sandstone rocks.

The descent from Kinver Edge was particularly beautiful… broadleaved woodland, big sandstone boulders carved with hundreds of pairs of initials over the years, ferns and mosses growing in the green gloom, a lush and lovely place.

Kinver Rock Houses

Kinver Rock Houses

Well outside the rock house.

Well outside the rock house.

Kinver Rock House

Kinver Rock House

View of Kinver, from Kinver Edge.

View of Kinver, from Kinver Edge.

Initials carved into the sandstone on Kinver Edge.

Initials carved into the sandstone on Kinver Edge.

Kinver Edge descent.

Kinver Edge descent.

Bee in a peony

Took these pictures of our peony after the rain yesterday. Can you spot the bee’s pollen sacs? I love how she’s colour coordinated with the stamens of the peony.

bumble_bee_peony

peony_raindrops

peony

Blue tit chicks in the nest

Attracted by the cheeping sound, I peered into a hole in a tree trunk (scarily low down – easy for predators to access) and could vaguely make out four little heads. A flash photo shows a couple of eager little beaks agape for anything the parent might bring back. I didn’t linger long, as the parent blue tit was hovering anxiously about and came straight to the nest as soon as I moved away.

blue_tit_chicks

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